Saturday, August 26, 2006

transparent thoughts

This a no home work post. Actually this is a post from a request.

Photographing transparent objects.

Sounds hard doesn't it? Rest assured....it is! There are a couple options when you need to do this:

1. Shoot from a slight angle
2. DON'T light directly ) dont use your flash and if you do use a external flash, bounce it of the ceiling)
3. natural lighting I have found works best.
4. if you are wanting to show that it is transparent put something behind it....books, flowers...anything.
5. if you are catching your reflection in the item you can build a tent for your object and leave a hole for your lens.

You will have to play with it. move abound find a good angle to shoot from.

Monday, August 21, 2006

remembering Joe Rosenthal

you know his work. i promise you do. you know the picture of the soldiers raiseing the flag at Iwo-Jima? that was him. He has died at age of 94.

HOMEWORK: Learn some more about Joe Rosenthal and shoot your landscape. in other word whats going on around you? going back to school? a festival in your 'hood? shoot the life goingon around you.......in b&w

P.S. regular scheduled programing next week! Scouts honor (even though i only last about 6 weeks as a girl scout)

Monday, August 14, 2006

Traditional Classic Portraiture-Part One of Posing Women

Welcome back all!!! Did you guys catchup at all....wanna hear something horrible...i think I took out my camera twice in the last two weeks! Gasp in horror!!!

I'm going to do another "series" of lessons. Actually these lessons will come from my notes of a entire semester of Portraiture. Don't worry I will do a bit at a time! You know me I try not to overwhelm anyone! Also any questions please post here with your email addy or e-mail me at andie_smith@mac.com

Part One of Posing Women
There is an important distinction between full length, three quarter length, and head and shoulders poses, but the general core stucture is the same.

The Classic Feminine Pose:
1. Body turned SLIGHTLY away from camera
2. Head and body facing opposite directions
3. Head tilt toward HIGH SHOLDER (usually the one closer to the camera)

HOMEWORK:
1. look through magazines and see how even in HIgh End fashion or everyday ads photographers use these "core" elements.
2. take some feminine portraits.